IMMUNISATIONS

Immunising against common childhood diseases is safe and effective and can save your baby’s life. Immunisation must take place during specific weeks or months of your baby’s growth. Some vaccines need to be given more than once to work properly.

The nurse at the clinic will give your baby a vaccination and/or drops. The benefits of getting vaccinations are greater than the risk of side-effects. Immunisations are free of charge for all children in South Africa.

Make sure you keep an official record of all your child’s immunisations, so that you can provide this when your child goes to school and if your child goes to hospital.

You will need to take your child to be immunised at the following dates:

6 WEEKS


At 6 weeks your baby will be immunised against some very dangerous diseases:

 

10 WEEKS


Your baby will be given a second DTaP-IPV-Hib-HBV2 injection to protect against diphtheria, tetanus,
whooping cough, polio, hib disease and hepatitis B.

 

14 WEEKS


Your baby will be given a third DTaP-IPV-Hib-HBV3 injection to protect against diphtheria, tetanus,
whooping cough, polio, hib disease and hepatitis B.
Your baby will be given another PCV2 injection (pneumococcal conjugated vaccine) to protect against meningitis, pneumonia or blood infection.

 

6 MONTHS


Your baby will be given a measles1 injection to protect against measles.

 

9 MONTHS


Your baby will be given another PCV3 injection to protect against meningitis, pneumonia or blood infection.

 

12 MONTHS


Your baby will be given a second measles2 injection to protect against measles.

 

18 MONTHS


Your baby will be given a fourth DTaP-IPV-Hib-HBV4 injection to protect against diphtheria, tetanus,
whooping cough, polio, hib disease and hepatitis B..

 

6 YEARS


Your child will be given a Td injection to protect against tetanus and diphtheria.

 

12 YEARS


Your child will be given another Td injection to protect against tetanus and diphtheria.

 

If you have a daughter, at 9 years (Grade 4) she will be given 2 doses of HPV, to protect against human papillomavirus, in the form of injections administered through the School Health Programme, 6 months apart at her school. The HPV virus can result in cervical cancer. You do not need to make an appointment at the clinic for this vaccination.

VITAMIN A SUPPLEMENT

Vitamin A helps to promote healthy growth and fight infections. Breastmilk is rich in vitamin A. Some foods that are rich in vitamin A are: liver, dark green leafy vegetables (spinach, broccoli, cabbage), mango, paw-paw, yellow sweet potato and full-cream milk.

Your child will get a Vitamin A supplement (syrup) at the clinic every 6 months (starting at 6 months old), until your child is 5 years old.

TREATMENT FOR WORMS

Worm infections affect about 2 billion people worldwide. The eggs live in soil and water and your child may easily become infected. Worm infections affect children’s growth and development and can lead to serious health problems. There are safe and effective medicines to treat for worm infections, such as the tablets Mebendazole or Albendazole.

At the clinic, your child will get treated for worms every 6 months, starting from the age of 1 year, until your child is 5 years old. Your child will also be treated for worms at the 6-year and 12-year clinic visits.